Strachan Inspired Window

 

For this window I used two of Douglas Strachan's works to come up with my own window - 'Good Shepherd' east window, c.1902, Westruther Parish Church and 'Primitive age', c1913, The Hague. Here I have been inspired by Strachan's subdued palette and strong line work giving atmosphere to the subject of Neo-Celtic/Christian imagery. The window also uses semi-opaque glasses, plating, copper foil, lead and traditional black glass paint typical to the period.

Goldfinch window.

 

I wanted to take a more modern approach to depicting the neo-Celtic imagery of 19th century Scottish windows, using geometric lines and a limited bright palette. The goldfinch is a conceptually symbolic choice both being prominent in Scots lore and more widely in the UK as the 'thistle tweaker' due to their diet, said to represent the passion of Christ and his crown of thorns. This window uses traditional tracing black glass paint, enamel paints and lead came.

The Unknown Land

Newhaven window

 

Proposal for insertion of stained glass memorial window in historic Newhaven Fisherman's graveyard. Window references Newhaven folklore about the herring fishing industry's ties to a mythical willow tree. The historic wall will be protected by the use of a triple glazed wooden frame. The window is one of six sections, made with lead came and enamel paint.

Scottish folklore window

 

Inspired by the 19th century church I was restoring in Tombae. This window references the gothic revival movement and images from Scots folklore (with a particular focus on Orcadian folklore). This is a lead window painted with traditional glass paint and installed in a sea cave.

Thistle tweekers

 

I wanted to take a more modern approach to depicting the neo-Celtic imagery of 19th century Scottish windows, using lots of spacing and a limited bright palette. The goldfinch is a conceptually symbolic choice both being prominent in Scots lore and more widely in the UK as the 'thistle tweaker' due to their diet, said to represent the passion of Christ and his crown of thorns. The robins red patch is meant to represent when he helped lift the crown of thorns and in Celtic folk lore the bird helps people move between worlds. Here I have them both in golden yellow descending on a thistle. This window uses traditional tracing black glass paint, silver stain and lead came.

Mackintosh Inspired Rose

 

Mackintosh rose is inspired by Rennie Mackintosh arts and crafts style design. Mackintosh's designs were at the forefront of arts and crafts design in the west coast of Scotland at this time using opaque glasses, Japanese inspired line work and graceful use of space. 

Sunset Window

This utilitarian window lets beautiful opaque glasses and a fiery orange glass roundel take centre stage. This window works in a pair with 'Water window' which I developed at Rainbow stained glass studios.

Water Window

This utilitarian window lets calming translucent glasses and a soft mint glass roundel capture the viewers attention. This window works in a pair with 'Sunset window' and was developed in Rainbow Stained glass studios.

Blue Bottle Window

Simple window inspired by 1920's design which often included stylised depictions of geometric insects. Blue bottle window shows the beauty in often overlooked creatures. 

Shield Beetle Window

Simple window inspired by 1920's design which often included stylised depictions of geometric insects. Shield beetle window shows the beauty in often overlooked creatures.